Difference between revisions of "The Fasces as a symbol of authority"

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==p5. Etruscan civilization==  
 
==p5. Etruscan civilization==  
 
==p6. Roman Empire==
 
==p6. Roman Empire==
==20th Century==
 
===Fascism===
 
====Related ideologies and symbols of authority====
 
  
Instead of fasces the _________ used_____________.
 
  
Instead of fasces the Germans used the swastika.
 
 
Instead of fasces the Americans used a bundle of arrows with one arrow prominently visible in the center.
 
 
 
==Contemporary usage==
 
Where can fasces be found today?
 
 
=== In insignia ===
 
====Usage in Heraldry====
 
Few inanimate objects in heraldry carry a special significance distinct from that of the object itself, but among such objects are the escarbuncle, the fasces, and the key. The escarbuncle developed from the radiating iron bands used to strengthen a round shield, eventually becoming a heraldic charge.
 
 
The fasces (not to be confused with the French term for a bar or fess) is emblematic of the Roman magisterial office and has often been granted to mayors. Keys (taking a form similar to a "skeleton key") are emblematic of Saint Peter and, by extension, the papacy, and thus frequently appear in ecclesiastical heraldry.
 
=== On buildings ===
 
 
In the Oval Office, above the door leading to the exterior walkway, and above the corresponding door on the opposite wall, which leads to the president's private office
 
 
Note: the fasces depicted have no axes, possibly because in the Roman Republic, the blade was always removed from the bundle whenever the fasces were carried inside the city, in order to symbolize the rights of citizens against arbitrary state power.
 
l appearance and construction
 
 
=== On coins ===
 
 
Mercury dime
 
=Info or philatelic elements not currently not linked into the storyline=
 
==Stamps==
 
 
Romulus and Remus (bottom right)
 
 
{|
 
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} rom rem.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|}
 
  
 
Mercury with fasces  
 
Mercury with fasces  
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|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} merc a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} merc a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|}
 
|}
 +
  
 
Largest fasces  
 
Largest fasces  
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|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} boy huge a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} boy huge a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|}
 
|}
 +
 +
==p7. Middle Ages (Medieval Period)==
 +
==p8. Renaissance and Revolutionary Periods==
 +
 +
  
 
Machinery with fasces as ghosted image
 
Machinery with fasces as ghosted image
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|}
 
|}
  
Switzerland posthorn with fasces (two stamps plus minisheet) representing the coat of arms of St Gallen
+
==p9. Modern Period up to end World War I==
 +
==p10. 1920s=1930s Rise of Fascism==
 +
 +
Romulus and Remus (bottom right)  
  
 
{|
 
{|
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} swiss stamp a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
+
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} rom rem.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} swiss stamp b.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
+
|-
+
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} swiss minisheet.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
+
|-
+
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} swiss minisheet cover.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
+
 
|}
 
|}
 +
 +
==p11. 1940s Fall of Fascism==
 +
==p12. Related Ideologies and symbols of authority==
 +
 +
Instead of fasces the _________ used_____________.
 +
 +
Instead of fasces the Germans used the swastika.
 +
 +
Instead of fasces the Americans used a bundle of arrows with one arrow prominently visible in the center.
  
  
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|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} many 11a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|[[File:{{PAGENAME}} many 11a.jpg|thumb|1200px|ENTER DESCRIPTIVE TEXT HERE]]
 
|}
 
|}
 
Country with the most stamps depicting a fasces
 
 
Have a guess and I'd wager you'd be wrong...
 
 
OK, when you give up and want to know the answer, hold the right mouse key down and run your cursor over the blank space after "It is... " and you will be surprised! it is....    <font color="FFFFFF"> the New Hebrides!</font>
 
 
US stamps
 
 
Sc 282c? Webster with 2 fasces
 
  
 
==Covers==
 
==Covers==
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==Slogan cancels==
 
==Slogan cancels==
  
 +
==quiz Question: Which country has issued the most stamps depicting a fasces?==
  
=Additional information sought=
+
Have a guess and I'd wager you'd be wrong...
Fasces with Etruscan reference.
+
 
The info about the construction of a fasces.
+
OK, when you give up and want to know the answer, hold the right mouse key down and run your cursor over the blank space after "It is... " and you will be surprised! it is....    <font color="FFFFFF"> the New Hebrides!</font>
Anything Ian has sent me.
+
Why is that, do you know?
The original Ravenna cover.
+
 
 +
=p15 Contemporary usage=
 +
Where can fasces be found today?
 +
 
 +
== p15 On buildings ==
 +
 
 +
In the Oval Office, above the door leading to the exterior walkway, and above the corresponding door on the opposite wall, which leads to the president's private office
 +
 
 +
Note: the fasces depicted have no axes, possibly because in the Roman Republic, the blade was always removed from the bundle whenever the fasces were carried inside the city, in order to symbolize the rights of citizens against arbitrary state power.
 +
l appearance and construction
 +
 
 +
== p15 On coins ==
 +
 
 +
Mercury dime
 +
 
 +
== p16 In insignia ==
 +
===Usage in Heraldry===
 +
Few inanimate objects in heraldry carry a special significance distinct from that of the object itself, but among such objects are the escarbuncle, the fasces, and the key. The escarbuncle developed from the radiating iron bands used to strengthen a round shield, eventually becoming a heraldic charge.
 +
 
 +
The fasces (not to be confused with the French term for a bar or fess) is emblematic of the Roman magisterial office and has often been granted to mayors. Keys (taking a form similar to a "skeleton key") are emblematic of Saint Peter and, by extension, the papacy, and thus frequently appear in ecclesiastical heraldry.
 +
=p16 What replaced the Fasces as a symbol of Authority?=
  
  

Revision as of 11:54, 14 June 2019

This 16 page exhibit intends to use primarily philatelic material to show the usage of the Fasces (Allegory) as a symbol of authority from its beginnings in the Etruscan culture, through the Roman Empire, to modern day usage such as on coinage (the Mercury dime), in insignia (Los Angeles police department) and on buildings (e.g. entrance and exit of the Oval Office).

The rise and fall of Fascism in Italy in the 20th century will be covered only briefly, followed by an equally brief comparison with other ideologies of the times. I leave the detailed coverage of that topic to those with a more philosophical bent.

Interesting usages and designs will be noted throughout the exhibit.

To see the answer to the quiz question; just hold down the right mouse button while sliding the cursor over the empty area. Lo and behold - the correct answer will reveal itself.

The god Mercury as a Roman Lictor carrying a Fasces

Exhibit Plan

p1. Purpose of Fasces

p2. Physical appearance and construction

p3-4. Stylized versions (from different countries)

p5. Historical usage:

p5. Etruscan civilization

p6. Roman Empire

Mercury with fasces


Largest fasces Child with huge fasces

p7. Middle Ages (Medieval Period)

p8. Renaissance and Revolutionary Periods

Machinery with fasces as ghosted image

p9. Modern Period up to end World War I

p10. 1920s=1930s Rise of Fascism

Romulus and Remus (bottom right)

p11. 1940s Fall of Fascism

p12. Related Ideologies and symbols of authority

Instead of fasces the _________ used_____________.

Instead of fasces the Germans used the swastika.

Instead of fasces the Americans used a bundle of arrows with one arrow prominently visible in the center.


Largest number of fasces on a stamp So far this is what I have found...

11 (4 + 4 +3)

Covers

Postmarks

Meters

Italy


Overprints

Slogan cancels

quiz Question: Which country has issued the most stamps depicting a fasces?

Have a guess and I'd wager you'd be wrong...

OK, when you give up and want to know the answer, hold the right mouse key down and run your cursor over the blank space after "It is... " and you will be surprised! it is.... the New Hebrides! Why is that, do you know?

p15 Contemporary usage

Where can fasces be found today?

p15 On buildings

In the Oval Office, above the door leading to the exterior walkway, and above the corresponding door on the opposite wall, which leads to the president's private office

Note: the fasces depicted have no axes, possibly because in the Roman Republic, the blade was always removed from the bundle whenever the fasces were carried inside the city, in order to symbolize the rights of citizens against arbitrary state power. l appearance and construction

p15 On coins

Mercury dime

p16 In insignia

Usage in Heraldry

Few inanimate objects in heraldry carry a special significance distinct from that of the object itself, but among such objects are the escarbuncle, the fasces, and the key. The escarbuncle developed from the radiating iron bands used to strengthen a round shield, eventually becoming a heraldic charge.

The fasces (not to be confused with the French term for a bar or fess) is emblematic of the Roman magisterial office and has often been granted to mayors. Keys (taking a form similar to a "skeleton key") are emblematic of Saint Peter and, by extension, the papacy, and thus frequently appear in ecclesiastical heraldry.

p16 What replaced the Fasces as a symbol of Authority?