London Inland Office Branch (GB) Page 4

From Stamps of the World

Pre-stamp to 1899 1900-1999 2000-Present
The office came into existence with the end of the Two Penny Post in 1844

The Main office itself was generally known as E.C.D.O.,St.Martin’s-le-Grand, the Inland Office being a department therein.
This was a Post Office from Sept.1829
The Money Order Office was noted as being in Aldergate Street in the PO guide of 1858
Telegraph Office 1870. Code used = SM

By 1907 ‘London Chief Office’ had moved to King Edward St, EC1

Closed 22 April 1994

Clerks at work at the post office in London circa 1808.jpg

BACK TO PAGE ONE 1843 - 1852 IO
BACK TO PAGE TWO 1852 - 1855 IO
BACK TO PAGE THREE 1857 - 1858 IO
CURRENT PAGE 1858-1860 IO
TO PAGE FIVE 1861 - 1864 IO

The London Inland Cancel issues of 1858 - 1860[edit]

Demand for new handstamps was increasing along with the volumes of mail. The next re-issue of the cancels was in the early part of 1858. On February 27th the first batch was issued for numbers 1 to 44 and 50.

With the remainder issued in 1860

Single handstamps of 13 bars (2,9,9,2) omitting 9,38 and 40. The omission of handstamp number 40 was regarded as having being 'accidental'. Double and Triple Handstamps of 13 bars 2,9,6 shared,9,2). Whilst number 51 single was issued with a (3,7,7,3) formation of 13 bars.

1858 Steel Hand-stamps 13 Bars Large[edit]

Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,9,2
Bars 2,9,6 shared,9,2 DOUBLE

1858 Steel Hand-stamps 13 Bars Large[edit]

The full issue was completed in February of 1860 when numbers 52 to 74 Singles sent out, again omitting 61 & 66. These were arranged (3,7,7,3) small diamond and numerals. These cancels were being used in the Newspaper Branch of the Inland Office and were handling many broadsheets being posted around the country. As well as Newspapers, Circulars were being sent out to advertise manufacturers and organizations, who had realised that the cost of postage being low meant the could advertise to a wider 'postal' market. A Further issue for the Foreign Newspaper Office would also be required. These were new numerals 75 - 85 in double form with NO shared bars.


1860 Foreign Newspaper Office Issue[edit]

Issued specifically for the FNO posts these double cancels are numbered 75 to 85.
They are effectively double single cancels as they have no adjoining bars between them.
The PO records show that Triple handstamps were also ordered but there is no indication of where they were issued to, again these are effectively three singles on the same canceller, with no shared bars. Whilst shown in the records it should be noted that no usage of these 75-85 / 94-99 cancels have been seen, the may have been held in reserve and not put to use before the introduction of the Inland Newspaper Branch cancels of 1862 which were Barred un-boxed numerals.

Double Single cancels 9 Bars 2,5,5,2 no shared
(Allocate image only if one becomes available or free to use image*)

Treble Single cancels 9 Bars 2,5,5,2 no shared Shown in the postal records as having been ordered and made, no usage known.
Numerals 94 to 99
(Allocate image only if one becomes available or free to use image*)

1860 Hurried Reissues Steel Hand-stamps Various Bar configurations[edit]

Showing that some departments jobs were more volumous than most is the fact that re-issues of blocks of cancels had to be made to cope with the wear they were experiencing. The issue appears to have been rushed as the diamonds differ in shape and the numerals are not perfect. The arrangement of bars for this re-issue is also not standard.

Singles

Trebles


1860 Temporary Issue of the "Ellora" Steam Packet handstamps[edit]

In late August 1860 the Packet steamer "Ellora" was issued with its own handstamps.

Packet Steamer Ellora

Having requested handstamps to perform postal cancellations of items posted at sea. Packet Steamers often carried Passengers on their trips to supplemenmt their running costs who would write letters and use the available postal services.