Woodbridge (GB)

From Stamps of the World

1867 One Shilling Green Plate 6 Large White Corner Letters AL.jpg
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Woodbridge is a town in Suffolk, East Anglia, England, about 8 miles (13 km) from the seacoast. It lies along the River Deben and has a population of about 11,000. The town is served by Woodbridge railway station on the Ipswich–Lowestoft East Suffolk Line. It is within a few miles of the wider Ipswich urban area. Woodbridge is close to the most important Anglo-Saxon site in the United Kingdom, the Sutton Hoo burial ship. With 1100 years of recorded history, the town has retained a variety of historical architecture. There are facilities for boating and riverside walks on the River Deben.

Archaeological finds in the area show habitation from the Neolithic Age (2500–1700 B.C.).

The area was under Roman occupation for 300 years following Queen Boadicca's failed rebellion in 59 A.D. but there is little evidence of the Romans' presence. When the Roman soldiers were recalled to Rome in 410 A.D., there was a substantial Anglo-Saxon (Germanic) settlement. It was the Angles who gave East Anglia its name. Around the town there are various buildings from the Tudor, Georgian, Regency and Victorian eras. Woodbridge has a tide mill in working order, one of only two in the UK and among the earliest. The mill first recorded on the site in 1170 was run by the Augustinian canons. In 1536 it passed to King Henry VIII. In 1564, Queen Elizabeth I granted the mill and the priory to Thomas Seckford. In 1577 he founded Woodbridge School and the Seckford Almshouses, for the poor of Woodbridge. Two windmills survive, Buttrum's Mill, and Tricker's Mill. The former is open to the public.

Postmark Examples[edit]

1867 One Shilling Green Plate 6 Large White Corner Letters AL.jpg